The industry begging for workers amid Covid-19

Businesses needing essential workers are still hiring in droves, despite the second Covid-19 wave impacting the Australian economy, new LinkedIn data has revealed.

Transport and logistics jobs are up nearly 100 per cent on this time last year, and jobs in health care are up 68 per cent.

Public administration jobs are up just under 50 per cent compared with this time last year, and retail and manufacturing jobs are up 24 and 23 per cent respectively.

But if you’re not an essential worker, jobs are few and far between, the data revealed.

Year on year change in share of job posts by industry. Source: LinkedIn.

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Year on year change in share of job posts by industry. Source: LinkedIn.

Roles in consumer goods are down nearly 50 per cent, and jobs in corporate services are down 37 per cent.

Education roles are down 30 per cent, hardware and networking jobs are down 24 per cent and media and communications jobs are down nearly 20 per cent.

Hiring rates year on year. Source: LinkedIn.

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Hiring rates year on year. Source: LinkedIn.

“An unprecedented number of people have lost their jobs as a result of this pandemic, and it will likely take some time before we get back to the levels of growth and strength we saw before the pandemic hit,” LinkedIn ANZ country manager Matt Tindale said.

With jobs scarce, competition has surged.

Applications per job year on year. Source: LinkedIn.

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Applications per job year on year. Source: LinkedIn.

Now, there are at least 40 applications per job – double the amount of applications compared to the beginning of 2020.

What’s more, job seekers in industries that were badly hit, like recreation and travel, are now much more likely to apply for jobs outside of their industry.

The good news is hiring is slowly increasing, up 30 per cent since its lowest yearly point, but still down 10 per cent compared to last year.

However, this upward trend could plateau or decline again as a result of Victoria’s lockdown.

Article from: au.finance.yahoo.com